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Six ancient Greek statues discovered in southwestern Turkey

July 31, 2018 at 2:11pm
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Six statues dating back 2,000 years were discovered in the ruins of the ancient Greek city of Magnesia, situated in southwestern Aydın province’s Germencik district, according to Turkish newspaper Daily Sabah.

Professor Orhan Bingöl, who has been overseeing the excavations since 1984, said four female and one male statues were unearthed in the ruins of a temple to Artemis, adding that one of the statues’ gender was unknown.

Bingöl specified that all statues were found in the same area and were in good condition of preservation, placed face-down next to each other.

“We know that, along with the ones being displayed in Istanbul, Izmir and Aydın, there have been nearly 50 statues unearthed from Magnesia ruins. This discovery will not be the end of it and clearly shows we can find more statues in this particular area,” he noted.

The first excavations in Magnesia were conducted between 1891 and 1893 by a German archaeological team led by Carl Humann. The work lasted 21 months and partially unearthed the theatre, the Artemis temple, the agora, the Zeus temple and the prytaneion. Excavations were resumed at the site, after an interval of almost 100 years, in 1984, by Bingöl.