Diving

DIVING IN AYIA NAPA
– Agioi Anargyroi diving site at Cape Greco 
Open water (OW) qualification required. This is one of the most popular dives in the area with blowholes, tunnels and overhangs.
The site is situated some 10 minutes from Protaras on Cape Greco. Access is from the shore and the depth is 12 metres

– Green Bay diving site 
Open water (OW) qualification required. Access to the water is by land.
There are fragments of ancient amphorae on the seabed 12 metres underwater to be explored. There is also a variety of fish and abundant opportunities for photography.
The depth is 12 metres and visibility is 45 metres.

– The Canyon diving site at Cape Greco 
Advanced open water (AOW) qualification required. Situated at the south side of Cape Greco just under the cliffs, access is from the shore.
The dive has interesting rock formations and offers the opportunity to see stingrays and other fish. The water is crystal clear, with average visibility of 45 metres.
The average depth is 15 metres.

– The Caves diving site at Cape Greco   
Open water (OW) qualification required. This is one of the most popular dives in the area with blowholes, tunnels and overhangs.
The site is situated some 10 minutes from Protaras on Cape Greco. Access is from the shore and the depth is 12 metres.

– Liberty wreck
The Liberty wreck was one of the first purposely sunk wrecks in Cyprus and was originally sunk to create an artificial reef and encourage more marine life and divers back to the beautiful waters of Cyprus.
However, The Liberty is a great dive for any advanced diver and is also a good dive as part of your ‘Wreck Speciality’ course. If you are looking to dive the Zenobia wreck during your trip to Cyprus, the Liberty wreck is also a good preparation dive.
The Liberty wreck is located in approximately 1 km from the shore just outside Protaras and sits at a depth of approximately 27 metres

– Fishing vessel Nemesis III
The bottom trawler Nemesis III was built in France in 1956 and was previously named “Thalia”. It was brought to Cyprus in 1987 where it was registered under the Cyprus flag.
Soon after, it was licensed by the Department of Fisheries to operate in international waters. Nemesis III operated in the Eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea and in Libyan waters as well.
The vessel was then deployed in Protaras area, Paralimni Municipality at around 23 metres depth.

diving limassol(1)
DIVING IN LIMASSOL 
– Lady Thetis Wreck
Lady Thetis was a recreational cruise vessel it was built in Germany and it was registered under the Cyprus flag.
The vessel has been deployed in Dasoudi area, in Limassol at around 21-23 meters depth.

– The fishing vessel Costandis  
The fishing vessel Constandis that was operated as a bottom trawler and was built in USSR in 1989. Its original Russian name was “Zolotets”.
It was registered under the Cyprus flag in 1997 and operated in international waters in the Eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea for a short period of time.
The fishing vessel Costandis was deployed in Nature Reserve Area Dasoudi, Limassol Cyprus at around 25 meters depth.

– Akrotiri fish reserve diving site
Open water (OW) qualification required. Access is by boat.
This fish reserve near Akrotiri offers a fascinating opportunity to interact with local marine life. At some 9 metres, this dive is suitable for all divers who can hand feed groupers, moray eels, bream and bass and admire the octopus. Visibility is some 30 metres.

– The Three Stars wreck diving site  
Open water (OW) qualification required. This wreck, which caught fire and ran aground in 1972, is partly submerged in some 7 metres of water in the Akrotiri area.
A very interesting exploratory wreck dive for all levels, the vessel, is safe to enter.

diving in larnaca
DIVING IN LARNACA
– Fraggle 
The cargo barge sank complete with its load of heavy stone blocks.
Today, the blocks have been dispersed and litter the surrounding ocean floor – a welcome retreat for eels, moray eels and a variety of other fish.
The dive leads past the wreck, along a large scaffolding structure to a sunken helicopter.

– HMS Cricket diving site (A World War Two gunboat) 
Open water (OW) qualification required. Access is by boat.
Situated off Larnaca, this dive is an opportunity to explore an old British battleship that rests upside down on the seabed at 27 metres.
The World War Two gunboat survived the war. It was then anchored in Larnaca Bay and used as target practice by the RAF but sank in 1947 due to bad weather.
There is a sandy dip under the wreck. Divers can swim inside the hull through escape hatches and underneath the wreck.
The vessel is also home to groupers and other fish. Visibility is some 25 metres. The maximum depth is 33 metres.

– Helicopter wreck diving site (a British army helicopter) 
Open water qualification (OW) required. Access is by boat some 15 minutes offshore.
Situated off Larnaca, this dive is an opportunity to dive on a British Army Helicopter that sank to 16 metres below sea level in 1996.
The area is frequented by schools of fish and octopus. Average visibility is 25 metres and the average depth 16 metres.

– The Zenobia wreck diving site (Top World Dive Site)  
Advanced open water (AOW) qualification required. Access is by boat.
Just 1.4 kilometres off the coast of Larnaca, this is rated one of the 10 best wreck dives in the world.
The Zenobia, a Swedish Ro-Ro 172 metre ferry carrying 108 articulated lorries, sank in 1980. It lies on its port side on a flat bed of sand and rocks.
Both the ferry and its cargo are still intact and fascinating to explore. The wreck is also home to schools of fish, including grouper, barracuda and tuna.
The dive starts at 17 metres and bottoms at 43 metres. Visibility is up to 50 metres and water temperatures a comfortable 16 to 28 °C.

– The Alexandria
The Alexandria wreck was once an old fishing boat and it now sits in 30 metres underwater close to Larnaca harbour.
The Alexandria wreck is actually located near to the world famous Zenobia wreck which means you can easily dive the two wrecks in one day or simply dive both wrecks on different days.
Although the Alexandria wreck lives in the shadow of its neighbour ‘The Zenobia’, it is still a wreck worth diving and one that you can tick off your list.

coral reef
DIVING IN PAPHOS
– Manidjin Isle 
Between Lara and Paphos and opposite the fishing harbour of St. George, lies Yeronisos Island, better known to divers as Manidjin Isle.
The dive takes you to a depth of between 10 and 15 metres and reachable both by land and boat.
Vertical cliff faces, large holes spread out across shallow planes, tunnels and openings, a chimney leading all the way back up to the surface and spacious caverns with several entrances and exits make this dive quite unique. This conservation area is populated with varieties of cuttlefish, shoals of barracudas and breams

– Amphitheatre diving site 
Open water (OW) qualification required. Access is from the shore just past the headland at Coral Bay, a short walk down the rocks.
This is a particularly popular dive, ranging from 4 metres to some 12 metres.
It takes its name from the natural formation resembling an amphitheatre that was cut out of the rock by sea currents.
Besides the magnificent rock formations, there is an abundance of marine life to admire, including groupers, eels and cuttlefish.

– Amphorae Caves diving site 
Open water (OW) qualification required. There are a number of caves, including one with an amphorae encrusted roof, and gullies to explore at a depth of five to 12 metres.

– Devils Head diving site 
Open water qualification required. Access is by boat.
Located off the northwest coast of Paphos in the Akamas area, this dive combines caves and interconnecting tunnels at a depth of some 11 metres.
The really lucky divers may spot green and leatherback turtles during the turtle season. There is plenty of marine life to admire round the rock formation.

– The Vera K Wreck diving site
Open water qualification; (OW) required. Access is by boat some 25 minutes from Paphos harbour.
This Lebanese freighter ran aground in shallow water in 1972 and was initially used as target practice by the army.
But it was later declared a hazard to other ships and blown up in 1974. It now rests in a crater created by the explosion, 11 metres underwater.
Very close are two large archways and narrow tunnels suitable for experienced divers. There is also plenty of marine life to observe.

– Wreck of the White Star diving site 
Open water (OW) qualification required. This former Russian fishing vessel sank at sea, close to Paphos harbour in 2006 as she was being towed to Limassol to be completely scrapped.
She now lies on a rocky bottom, 14 to 18 metres underwater and is home to groupers, breams and other fish.

– Laboe Wreck
Laboe was built in Rendburg shipyard, Germany in 1940. It was a cruise vessel and was brought to Cyprus in 2006 by a private company.
Its length is 21.5 metres and breadth 5 metres.
The project for the deployment of the vessel “Laboe” near Moulia area in Yeroskipou/ Paphos was co-funded by the Government of Cyprus and the European Union, European Fisheries Fund 2007-2013: Sustainable Development of Fishing Sector.
The vessel was donated to the Department of Fisheries and Marine Research by the Cyprus Tourist Organisation and the Cyprus Dive Centres Association.

turtle
DIVING IN AKAMAS
– St. George Drop-off
It’s quite a challenge to find more beautiful cliff faces than those at St. George Drop Off. The island of Ayios Georgios lies east of the Akamas peninsula and hosts a reserve for birds and maritime life. Huge sponges, shimmering overgrown cliffs and secretive octopuses, cuttlefish, hermit crabs and many other creatures makes this dive quite a highlight.

– St. George Reef
Opposite the island of Ayios Georgios, directly beneath the towering cliffs of the Akamas peninsula a shallow diving spot sprawls, littered with colourful overhangs, cavernous archways, rock formations as well as elongated openings and canyons. Nature has all but claimed back the countless pieces of shattered amphora. A diverse playground for any diver.

– Nissi Koppos
This remote spot around the island of Koppos, west of the Akamas peninsula, is something of an insider’s tip, especially since it is best explored in the early hours of the morning, when you might catch a glimpse of the Mediterranean monk seal. The rocky island is surrounded by several tiers of planes, which at intervals are laced with large holes that open into bottle-like basins, while button polyps and sponges have happily taken over the walls of tunnels, overhangs and crevices. The “washing machine” awards a unique experience: divers are sucked into the flush of air-bubbles
created by the waves and expelled a few metres further on.